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Our blog is updated regularly by Candace Grand Pre and her students.


New Ice Core Improves Information on Low-Latitude Paleoclimate

Posted by on Apr 9, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

New Ice Core Improves Information on Low-Latitude Paleoclimate

Last week, an interesting article appeared on phys.org. In 2003, researchers from Ohio State University extracted a set of especially high-quality ice cores from the Quelccaya ice cap in the Peruvian Andes, and have preserved it to protect important data from loss due to regional melting. Recently, these scientists have produced a reconstruction of the regional climate dating back to about 1800 years BP. The enhanced resolution of the samples have allowed for more a detailed analysis using δ18O, along with other methods (ammonium, nitrate,...

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Melting Glaciers in Canada Pose a Threat to Sea Level Rise

Posted by on Mar 31, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

Melting Glaciers in Canada Pose a Threat to Sea Level Rise

On March 22nd, 2013, an article was posted in Climate Central about the melting of Canada’s glaciers.  Author Alex Kirby explains that a group of European scientists have developed a model that accurately “predicted” the melting that has occurred in the last ten years, leading confidence to its future predictions. These future predictions indicate that Canada’s glaciers will melt at an accelerating pace, mostly as an effect of a positive feedback loop. As glaciers melt, they reveal dark colored land underneath, which...

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Rising Temperatures Possibly Causing More Severe Storms

Posted by on Mar 27, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

Rising Temperatures Possibly Causing More Severe Storms

Last week in science news, an article was posted about how rising global sea temperatures are expected to cause more severe hurricanes in the Atlantic Ocean. The amount of hurricanes that occur and their severity depends upon the heat of the water and how much water vapor is evaporated that add fuels to the storms. Researches have concluded that for every 1.8˚F increase in water temperatures there will be a associated increase of hurricane severity by twofold to sevenfold. From 1970 to 2004 the total number of hurricanes has decreased,...

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Volcano Emitted Aerosol Could Affect Atmospheric Temperature

Posted by on Mar 8, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

Volcano Emitted Aerosol Could Affect Atmospheric Temperature

This week, Ryan Neely III and his colleagues concluded in their new study that volcano erupted aerosol that went into the stratosphere had slowed down the increase in global temperature by about 25 %. The cooling effect of aerosol particles is primarily due to their light-scattering capability. According to the article published on Arizona Daily Star, the amount of stratospheric particles had been rising 4 to 7 percent from 2000 to 2010. Neely also argued that their computer model showed that human contribution on the increase in atmospheric...

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China in danger of drastic Sea-level Rise

Posted by on Mar 6, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

China in danger of drastic Sea-level Rise

According to a recent article in China Daily, titled “China’s sea level continues to rise,” many Chinese citizens living along the coast are in extreme danger due to relative sea level rise. With a coastline of more than 32,000 kilometers, many of these already low-lying areas are also being forced into the sea by the enormous weight of fluvial sediment, exacerbating the issue of a rising sea due to global warming. This escalating situation is foreboding for coastal China as a State Oceanic Administration report stated that sea level rose 53...

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Future Developments of Sea Level Rise and Its Unequal Distribution

Posted by on Feb 25, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

Future Developments of Sea Level Rise and Its Unequal Distribution

On February 18th, an article was posted on eurekalert.org about new projections on sea level rise. Paul B. Holland reports the latest analysis developed by a team of scientists who further examined the proven fact that the sea does not rise uniformly and formulates a new model that gives greater insight into the details of the distribution. The model takes into account several factors, such as the varying amounts of isostatic rebound of continental crust around the globe, thermal expansion, and gravitational pull of ice sheets. It indicates...

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Sandy, Katrina, and Sea Level Rise

Posted by on Feb 16, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

Sandy, Katrina, and Sea Level Rise

On February 13, 2013, an article was posted in Scientific American about Hurricane Sandy.  Author Jeff Tollefson illustrates the effects of the hurricane in the New York area, and how it relates to sea level rise.  During the storm, sea level rose “2.75 meters above the mean high-water level.”  There has been a great deal of contention within the science world about how human contributions to global warming can lead to more intense and more frequent “super storms”.  It may be too soon to tell, but there are some...

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Demand for Energy Increases Demand for Fresh Water

Posted by on Feb 11, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

Demand for Energy Increases Demand for Fresh Water

Two weeks ago in the news, an article was published in National Geographic News that predicted the global energy industry would double their demand for fresh water by 2035. Written by Marianne Lavelle and Thomas Grose as part of a special series on energy issues, the article outlined how biofuels and coal plants use around 75% of fresh water consumed in energy production today: with the population increasing, the demand for energy and therefore for water is expected to increase dramatically in this field. The article concludes that the only...

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Groundwater Depletion Contributes to Rising Sea Level

Posted by on Feb 2, 2013 in Blog | 1 comment

Groundwater Depletion Contributes to Rising Sea Level

This week, Diana Allen, an Earth scientist at Simon Fraser University, stated in an interview that agriculture in many regions of the world is heavily dependent on groundwater for irrigation. In one of her articles, she said that climate change and several other human-driven factors would combine to further contribute to groundwater depletion. The growing population and extreme droughts are the major contributing factors discussed in her article. She believes that the depletion will also contribute to sea level rise, by transporting stored...

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Finding Fossils for Pliocene Proxy

Posted by on Jan 27, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

Finding Fossils for Pliocene Proxy

This past week, Justin Gillis published an article in the New York Times titled “How High Could the Tide Go?” as part of Temperature Rising, a series that describes the controversy and science of global warming.  This article highlights the exciting fieldwork of paleoclimatology and stresses the significance of this research for modeling and predicting future sea level rise. To better understand how sea level may change today, Dr. Maureen E. Raymo of Columbia University is locating fossil beaches to determine the sea level during the...

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